Calling the Doctor

Post copyright by Doris McCraw

Doris

 

 

 

 

 

As many of the readers of this blog know, I’ve been researching the women doctors of Colorado for some time now. My cut off date is 1900. The interesting thing about my research is the request I sometimes receive when others are looking for someone. It has happened twice in the last year. One doctor was Kate Yont, who I wrote about a while back. Recently I was asked to supplement some information about Dr. Albertine Yale. She falls outside of my parameters , but you may find her story interesting.

 

Dr. Yale was born in Wisconsin around 1867. She was Albert Yale on June 22, 1887 and divorced him in 1907 for non-support.  Shortly thereafter she filed for ‘child support’ of $40 a month for their three children 2 boys, 1 girl, ages 19, 16, and 12. At the time he worked at the Colorado Title and Trust Company in Colorado Springs.

A 1903 graduate of the Milwaukee Medical College in Wisconsin, she received her Colorado license in January of 1904. In the 1906-07 city directory her practice as a physician and surgeon in Colorado Springs offices  were on Tejon street. Her office hours were 2-4 pm and 7-8 pm.

View of headstones in Evergreen Cemetery

View of headstones in Evergreen Cemetery

Sometime after the divorce she removed her practice to an area about twenty-five miles south of town. The area became known as Bardeen, which was her maiden name. There was a post office there from 1917-1924. Albertine died in 1920 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Colorado Springs. The town which bore her maiden name no longer exists. It is now part of the Ft. Carson military base.

There is more to be researched about this woman and her family, but for now, this is the story we have. Perhaps when I finish the doctors prior to 1900 I’ll move to the ones before WWII. Time will tell. In the meantime, I have a couple of fiction pieces I will be finishing up. With luck readers will enjoy them this year.

Happy researching and writing, for the stories are there if you but look.

 

home for his heart angela raines

HOME FOR HIS HEART
http://www.amazon.com/Home-His-Heart-Angela-Raines-ebook/dp/B00LU3HZEK/
also available as an ebook on Barnes & Noble and Smashwords.

Doris Gardner-McCraw/Angela Raines
Author, Speaker, Historian-specializing in
Colorado and Women’s History

Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/author/angelaraines-dorismccraw
Photo and Poem: http://fivesevenfivepage.blogspot.com
Blog: http://renawomyn.blogspot.com/ 

 

 

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16 Responses to Calling the Doctor

  1. Wranglers says:

    It just amazes me how mamy women doctors there were during that era. Thanks for sharing. Cher’ley

    Like

    • Doris says:

      You are welcome. The information just keeps popping up. The wonderful thing now, people come to me when they want to know about these women. That is such a compliment I feel. There really were a lot here. Doris

      Like

  2. Neva Bodin says:

    I admire your tenacity in researching these remarkable women, and your ability to ferret out so much information. Also enjoy reading about and imagining their lives. Thanks for another interesting blog, Doris.

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    • Doris says:

      You are welcome, Neva. This one was handed to me. A friend was researching and had hit a brick wall. I think because I am so acquainted with the process I could get past the problems and find what they needed. I feel so blessed to be telling their stories. Doris

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  3. Kathy Waller says:

    Your posts have given–are giving–me a new perspective on history. Thank you.

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  4. I had no idea women could file for child support in 1907? I really enjoy your posts Doris. The research you put into your posts make them good reading for all!

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  5. Gayle Irwin says:

    Doris, what courage and fortitude this woman, and many others, had — divorce was so uncommon in those days and for a woman to accuse the man of non-support: WOW! that took great courage (and confidence). Thank you for bringing these people “back to life” for us and inspiring us with their stories! Good luck with your fiction pieces — I HAVE TO get back to that part of my writing career: I miss it!

    Like

    • Doris says:

      Gayle, she was pretty amazing. I know I’ve just touched the surface with her story, but time will tell.
      The fiction I’ve made promises, so I will deliver. (Sigh) But I do love telling stories. Just received an amazing 5 Star for “Home” and it does inspire me to keep on. Doris

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  6. sstamm625 says:

    How nice that others come to you for help with their research. That speaks highly of you, Doris. Another interesting story about another strong and brave woman doctor.

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    • Doris says:

      Thank you Stephanie. I find I enjoy helping others to find the information about these women. I want their stories to be told. Doris

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  7. Nancy Jardine says:

    What you’ve found already is really interesting, Doris. Not an easy choice for that woman to make but so resourceful. Thanks for sharing.

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    • Doris says:

      I was pleased when a friend asked me to add to the knowledge they had. It seems she had fallen through the cracks, but then she was just past my cut off date. I do admire her determination to follow through on what she felt was right. Doris

      Like

  8. S. J. Brown says:

    I am amazed that you were able to get so much information. I suppose the more you research the more you learn about where to look for information. Very interesting thanks for sharing.

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    • Doris says:

      S.J., you are correct. When you know where to start looking the rest falls in place fairly quickly. I realize I talk a lot about these women, but their stories are so fascinating I just have to share. Doris

      Like

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