“Let There Be Light”

propic11_1This post by L.Leander, Author of Fearless Fiction

“We’ll leave the light on for you.” proclaimed Tom Bodet in radio commercials for Motel 6. Remember them? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cVRMGEL5GY

Every Light in the House Is On” written by Kent Robbins and made popular by Trace Adkins in 1996 was nominated at the CMA Awards for Music Video of the year, declaring the man would leave every light on in the house until his lover came home and they could rebuild their relationship. You can watch the video here:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=72AVXpeo_ZI

One of my favorite hymns as a child was titled “The Light of The World is Jesus,” written by Philip Bliss. You can listen to it here:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIWvYrkSbNQ

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

A short definition in the Merriam Webster Dictionary presents the meaning of light as:

: the form of energy that makes it possible to see things : the brightness produced by the sun, by fire, a lamp, etc.

: a source of light (such as an electric lamp)

: a light on a vehicle

You can read the full definition here:PICT0171

www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/light

How many of you have experienced SAD or know someone who has? You can read about Seasonal Affective Disorder here:

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/…/con-20021047

2015 is the International Year of Light. Did you know that? You can read some interesting facts in an article by Mika McKinnon. You will see some incredible photos and explanations here:

http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/news/20-illuminating-enlightening-day-brightening-facts-about-light here:

This Sunday, November 1, we turn our clocks back.  We lose an hour of light. Did you know that Daylight Savings Time was suggested by Benjamin Franklin in 1784?  If you’d like to read a full mooncomprehensive article about the reasons for the change go here:

www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/c.html

Are you a light? Do you draw people to you? Do readers love what you have written? Are your books light or dark? Do you write best during the day with plenty of light coming in through the windows or in the evening dark with lamps on?

I am sitting here on an overcast day writing this with a “daylight” lamp on my desk. That’s why I came up with this idea. Hopefully, you’ll check out a few links for some awesome information about light. I’ve learned a lot of very interesting information just by writing this post!

Books by L.Leander:

Inzared Queen of the Elephant Riders Video Trailer

Inzared, Queen of the Elephant RidersInzaredonecover

Inzared, The Fortune Teller Video Trailer

inzaredtwocoverInzared, The Fortune Teller (Book Two)

You can also find L.Leander here:

L.Leander Website

Amazon Author Page

Facebook Author Page

L.Leander Books Blog

L.Leander’s Book Reviews and Interviews

Twitter

LinkedIn

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This entry was posted in Benjamin Franklin, critical thinking, Daylight Savings Time, Definition of light, description, Education, illumination, International Year of Light, Lamps, learning, Light, lights, research, Science, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Sunshine, The Light of the World is Jesus, Tom Bodet, unique, Winter Blues and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to “Let There Be Light”

  1. katewyland says:

    I’m extremely sensitive to light and do tend to get SAD when the days get shorter. What’s funny is that light disturbs my sleep so I use blackout drapes and a sleep mask if I can’t get it dark enough. I also don’t like a lot of lights on at night – in contrast to my husband who would turn on every light in the house if I didn’t object. Yet, during the day I want the house bright with lots of sunlight coming in. Go figure. I also use a daylight lamp in winter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I not only have to have the house dark at night but totally quiet. I do use my daylight lamp in the evening if I’m knitting or doing handwork, but otherwise a lamp will do. I’ve never experienced SAD (I think I haven’t) but I definitely do not handle the Daylight Savings change well!

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  2. Doris says:

    Not to make a pun, but brilliant and illuminating.

    I also have some issues with SAD, but living in Colorado, I do get the sun at some point most days which helps. I find that funny, since most of my writing is done after dark. A night time person who needs the light. **Sigh** Thanks for a very intersting and useful post Linda. Doris

    Liked by 1 person

    • I definitely feel better in the sunlight, in fact I recently had to take a round of very strong Vitamin D. My doctor says it’s probably from living in Mexico for so long, where every day is sunny, and moving back to the midwest where the the days are short and the nights are long. I do try to get out as much as I can, but honestly, I’m so involved in art journaling right now Ihave been spending a lot of time in the basement, where my workroom is. Lucky for me, it’s well lit. I also take the dog for a walk rain or shine and it’s good for both of us.

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  3. Mike Staton says:

    Our perspective on ‘light’ is based on not only the amount of overcast in the sky, but our location in orbit in relationship to the ultimate light-bringer… the sun. Venus is much closer to the sun, but it’s shrouded in with thick clouds, so it’s not as light as on Earth. Same with Mars; it’s never as cloudy as on Earth or on Mars (except if there’s a global dust storm) but because it’s farther from the sun than Earth, the sun looks smaller in the sky. Earlier this year, the space probe New Horizons did a flyby of the farthest ‘maybe’ planet in our solar system… Pluto. It’s so far away the sun looks tiny, virtual the size of a star. I wonder if there’s been studies done on how the amount of sunlight on Mars will affect colonists’ mental outlook?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Neva Bodin says:

    I don’t think people give enough credit to light or “the” light (sun), or Jesus as the Bible refers to him. Many people are affected by SAD and don’t know it, probably to differing degrees. Most every thing needs sunlight to produce and grow. Our body rhythms are affected by light. Light, heat and water, can’t do without them for long. And it is a great metaphor for evil, often done in darkness, and shedding light on the situation. I love lots of light around me. And you have shed some light today!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I think people enjoy my work, although sometimes, I write about darker subjects like my husband’s death. September and October ar tricky months what with our wedding anniversary, Bill’s birthday, and the anniversary of his passing. Once we get into November, I should begin to see the light.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Travis says:

    I was a night writer for several years and then made a transition into early morning writing. Now I’m barely writing, doing most of it during lunch breaks. I feel I write better with clouds than with sunshine. I’m more introspective with gray filtered light.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Isn’t it interesting how each of us are different? I wrote my first whole book at night. It was a quiet, creative time for me. I wrote the second book primarily in the day time and I didn’t enjoy it nearly as much, nor do I feel it was my best work. I love the sun but there is also benefit in darkness.

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  7. I do love sunshine. I tend to feel lazy and tired when it’s nighttime and when it’s a particularly dreary day. I write best in the early morning although lately, I’ve been staying up late to read as I’m so behind on my reading for my job, friends’ novels, etc. that it makes it harder to get up early and write. Thanks for the interesting post!

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    • Thank you for the comment Sarah. I’ve never tried writing in the early morning because I’ve always used the quiet time before the day begins to meditate and do my computer work. I need to try it and rearrange what I do now. I might find I like it better because now that I’m not living alone the evening is full of the television and other noise and it’s hard to concentrate. I did buy my husband a headset and he’s very good about using it but it’s not as peaceful.

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  8. Joe Stephens says:

    As I’ve grown older, winter has become harder and harder to endure, and I’m convinced it has more to do with the lack of light than the cold. Falling back tonight will be a sad event for me. I begin to feel anxious as the darkness goes on. It’s nothing that’s debilitating, but I sure do prefer a long, sunny day.

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  9. I have a real problem when time is turned ahead in spring and back in winter. My friends and family have always told me to quit thinking about it, that it’s no different than any other day, but I’ve continued to struggle. I recently read a report that focused on Bipolar Disorder and Daylight Savings Time. Apparently, some Bipolar people are more affected by having their circadian rhythms disturbed, which can lead to mania, depression or anxiety. This can cause them to become disoriented, stressed, and “out of whack.” Oh boy, here it comes, tonight already, but I’ll be all right in a few days!

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  10. Nancy Jardine says:

    Living on the 57.24 Deg North parallel I need that change of the clocks (which the UK did last Sunday) to make the mornings lighter, though the effect only lasts for a few weeks because by the winter solstice the weather is generally into the winter gloom. I’m writing this at 9. 30a.m. and it’s actually a sunny blue sky with about 50% cirrus clouds…and that makes me feel a lot better about how the day will go. I do feel a lot less cheery when I awake to endless heavy grey clouds and rain – and we get that a lot. So, yes- we in Scotland are affected by SAD though we don’t as a nation bother about it too much since we’ve learned to live with it. I think it was in the 1980s that the UK decided to NOT change the clocks and it was pretty awful for those in the far north of Scotland. The kids went to school in the dark, and came home in the dark, and because of winter weather they were often not even out at playtimes (your recess times) so they experienced NO outside daylight for days on end. Personally I’m not really bothered much, but I do try to get out into the garden or I take the grandkids for a walk, even if cloudy.

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  11. Wranglers says:

    I have SAD, but I didn’t know it until I had written an article about it. I kept saying, “Yes that’s me, yes–that’s so me.” LOL Light is so important, and I hope as a Christian I am always the light of the world. The Sunday School song, “This Little Light of Mine.” This is a great blog with a lot of useful info. Thanks, Cher’ley

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    • I’m not sure I’ve experienced SAD but feel for those who do. I love the song “This Little Light of Mine”. Brings back happy childhood memories! And don’t worry. You bring a little light into everyone you meet!

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  12. I, too, experience SAD each winter, and now that it’s dark at 5 pm my time, when I leave work, I seem to always SIGH when going outdoors. My husband and I were blessed to enjoy the last weekend of October in SW Utah, under sunshine and blue skies, surrounded by natural beauty of red rocks and amazing creatures and special people — that lightened my mood! I need to look into one of those lamps — or I need to hibernate until spring like a grizzly bear! Thanks for a sweet and educational post, Linda!

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  13. I dislike the dark coming earlier, but I then get to enjoy such beautiful mornings! Glad you had the trip to Utah to get you “in shape” for the winter to come. I do agree that when I was working it was harder for me when I got home early and it was already dark. I felt like I didn’t see the sun much until the weekends!

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  14. S J Brown says:

    I tend to write at sporadic times. I guess when the mood strikes. As for light my favorite light source is the sun. A day when there is lots of sunlight doesn’t seem as cold even on a bitter day. Also the sun fuels my solar lights. I have several along with a solar exhaust fan and solar Christmas lights.

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