I Stayed Up All Night Writing This

Posted by M. K. Waller

[Forgive me. This post is longer than I intended, but once I got started, I couldn’t stop. I had no idea I’m so enlightened. If you stop reading before the end, I’ll forgive you. But you’ll miss the good part.]

My husband once told me that when I tell stories, I should start with the headline. So here it is.

Before

My CT scan twelve months after completing radiation treatments was clear.

The first time I posted about having cancer, I said I would write about the experience. I am a writer, I said, so I will write, or words to that effect.

The statement dripped with drama. You can practically hear the rolling r‘s: I will wr-r-r-r-r-r-ite.

Such overstatement is normal. We newbie writers are always trying to reassure ourselves. We’re just starting out, we haven’t published much (or anything at all), we don’t make a living from writing* (we may make nothing at all), we ‘re not confident in our abilities, and–let’s face it–much of what we write stinks (and we don’t know it stinks until a member of a critique group tells us).

Established writers encourage us: If you write, you are a writer. Believe it. Say you’re a writer.

We believe it until someone asks what we do. Then we either clam up; shuffle our feet, look at the floor, and mumble, I’m a wmbrl; or declare, too loudly, I’m a WRITER. Then we blush and shuffle our feet. 

After publishing the aforementioned post, I re-read it, then blushed and shuffled my feet. I’m been shuffling ever since.

But moving on:

When I said I would write, I probably had the idea I would learn secrets of the universe and share them in capital letters and red ink.

But I’ve had no mystical experiences. Altogether, it’s been mostly humdrum. But I’ve learned a few things about myself, and about life in general, and I’ll share those:

  • Chemotherapy isn’t the same for everyone. I went around saying the side effects were mild.  When I’d been off the evil drug for a month or two, I realized I had felt pretty rotten. Still, I was lucky. It wasn’t that bad. Surgery wasn’t difficult either. Radiation was nothing: I showed up for twenty consecutive days, let the techs admire my cute socks, and went home. That was it. Lucky.
  • Being complimented on my taste in socks makes me feel good. The radiation techs liked the ninjas and the cats wearing glasses the best. The oncologist asked what the ninjas were; I had to tell him I didn’t know. One of the techs told me. I don’t know why the oncologist was looking at my socks.
  • Phase I

     

  • I have no vanity. Hats and turbans were hot. I tossed them, went around bald, and discovered my head, just like Hercule Poirot’s, is egg-shaped.
  • It’s possible to survive for months on Rice Krispies, as long as you don’t run out of sugar.
  • If you don’t drink enough water, you keel over in the oncologist’s office, where you went just to check that great big lymph node that popped up under your jaw, and end up in the hospital. If your temperature doesn’t go down, the night nurse comes in and jerks your three blankets off, and you spend the night under a thin little sheet, slowly turning into an icicle, but your temperature goes down. (That’s opposite to the way my mother did it, but whatever.) They call in a specialist in communicable diseases who orders tests, and when you ask the nurse what they found, she comes bopping in about midnight and says, “Guess what! You have the common cold.” And she’s so sweet and so cute, you feel bad about nearly (deliberately) knocking her off the bed while she was trying to do that nasal swab.
  • Airports have wheelchairs. Thinking you can get from gate to gate without one is dumb. Don’t try it.
  • Phase II

    Chemo brain is real. At present I am dumb as dirt, and not in the way mentioned above. I picked up a brochure about chemo brain at the clinic and, I am proud to say, was able to read (most of) it with my forty-five-year-old Spanish. Because I knew what it said before I picked it up: It’s real, don’t worry, talk to your family/friends/counselor/minister/doctor/whoever and tell them to get used to it, make a habit of writing-things-down-putting-your-keys-in-the-same-place-when-you’re-not-using-them-everything-you-ought-to-be-doing-now-anyway, and it’ll go away, maybe. I may have missed a couple of points. If I ever want to know what they are, I’ll google.

  • Chemo hair is curly. I knew it would be curlier than before, but it is c u r l y. I’m tempted to get it buzzed off again.
  • TRIGGER WARNING: THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR ALL AUDIENCES: When a twelve-year-old flat-chested surgeon you have to see because your surgeon went on vacation–my doctors always go on vacation–insists you must wear a sports bra and says, “We’re going to get you out of that pretty lacy bra,” do not hold back. Tell her that pretty lacy bra is made of cast iron, and that all the bras you’ve ever had since like 1962 have been made of cast iron, and that sports bras might as well be made of spider webs, and she can take a long walk off a short pier. You’ll feel a lot better if you say that. I would have felt a lot better if I had.
  • The kindness of strangers is real. When they see a woman with no hair, they understand what’s going on. Women wearing turbans whisper, “Good luck.” People smile. If you wobble a bit, they run to prop you up and offer to help you get wherever you’re going. I didn’t have to take them up on the offers–my wobbling, like my reaction to chemo, was mild–but I appreciated every one of them. Mr. Rogers’ mother told him when things got scary, to “look for the helpers.” She was right. They’re out there.
  • In addition to boosting your immune system, a smile can lift your spirits. It’s good for your doctors, nurses, and everyone else in the clinic as well. Oncologists don’t have it easy. They need all the support they can get.
  • Phase Now

    According to my radiation oncologist, cancer is now a chronic disease. But in one way it’s the same as it was when I was a child: It’s kept under wraps. The word isn’t whispered as it was then, but it isn’t spoken too loudly. That’s one reason I didn’t cover my head. The topic needs to be brought out into the open. People need to see.

  • On the other hand, a little denial can be a good thing. And it can be balanced with acceptance.
  • I didn’t fall apart when told my prognosis, including the average length of survival. I’d always wondered what I would do under those circumstances, and now I know. That time, at least.

Most important, and over and over, I learned that David is good. Not a good husband, or a good man, but good. I knew it when I married him. Every day, he proves me right.

Finally, I learned something else I already knew: There isn’t enough time. We all know it, but the knowledge carries more weight for some of us than for others.

I think of Andrew Marvell:

Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, Lady, were no crime….
   But at my back I always hear
Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.

And of Keats:

When I have fears that I may cease to be 
   Before my pen has gleaned my teeming brain, 
Before high-pilèd books, in charactery, 
   Hold like rich garners the full ripened grain; 
When I behold, upon the night’s starred face, 
   Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, 
And think that I may never live to trace 
   Their shadows with the magic hand of chance; 
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour, 
   That I shall never look upon thee more, 
Never have relish in the faery power 
   Of unreflecting love—then on the shore 
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think 
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink.

My brain isn’t teeming, and certainly not at the level of a Keats, but I would like to write more than I have. I’d like to do a number of things I won’t have time–would never have had time–to do. Time’s winged chariot is following close. Still, I commit the crime of wasting what I should spend. The post I wrote last month about playing Candy Crush is not fiction. But…

The next CT scan comes in March. Till then, I’ll write what I can, do what I can, and say what Anne Lamott calls little beggy prayers.

The Usual

In other words, I’ll go on with life as usual.

 

 

 

***

“Statue of Angelina Eberly” by Kit O’Connell is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0. Via Wikipedia.

The Usual photograph is detail from a statue of Angelina Eberly, the “Savior of Austin,” that stands at the corner of 6th Street and Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas. In 1842, following the Texas Revolution, Sam Houston sent Texas Rangers to Austin to remove the government archives to Washington-on-the-Brazos, where the Texas Declaration of Independence was signed (and very near the town of Houston). Houston claimed Austin was too vulnerable to Indian attack for the documents to be safe there.

Angelina and other residents of Austin, the capital of the Republic of Texas, claimed Houston was stealing the records because he wanted to make the city of Houston the capital. Angelina knew Sam Houston didn’t like Austin; he made no secret of his dislike, and while president of the Republic, had lived at her inn instead of at the official residence. The fact that the Rangers came under cover of darkness gave more credence to the her view.

When Angelina heard the Texas Rangers up to no good, she hurried to 6th and Congress and fired off the town cannon. She missed the Rangers but blew the side off the General Land Office building. Noise from the cannon alerted the populace, who came running and scared off the Rangers.

Thanks to Angelina Eberly, Austin remained the capital of the Republic of Texas, and is  capital of the State of Texas to this day.

The statue of Angelina Eberly was sculpted by cartoonist Pat Oliphant. The accompanying plaque attributes Austin’s continued status as Texas’ most premier city to Angelina’s combination of “vigilance and hot temper.”

***

*Stephen King makes a living by writing. Danielle Steel makes a living by writing. Mary Higgins Clark makes a living by writing. Agatha Christie made a whale of a living by writing. Other writers either have a day job or have won the lottery.

***

Literature does have its purpose. If you doubt it, see my post on Telling the Truth, Mainly: “A Mind Unhinged.” It isn’t as long as this one.

John Keats, “When I have fears”

Andrew Marvell, “To His Coy Mistress”

***

I am a writer and I wr-r-r-r-r-r-ite. My short stories appear in Austin Mystery Writers’ crime fiction anthology, Murder on Wheels; in the anthology Day of the Dark: Stories of Eclipse; and in the Fall/Winter 2012/2013 issue of the online magazine Mysterical-E (which I like to think of as the one with the dog on the cover). Another of my stories will appear in Austin Mystery Writers’ second anthology, Lone Star Lawless, coming soon from Wildside Press. I at Telling the Truth, Mainly and at Austin Mystery Writers.

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19 Responses to I Stayed Up All Night Writing This

  1. Doris says:

    I loved every word. Thank you for the honesty and willingness to share your ‘life journey’ and for being a WRITER. Doris

    Like

    • M. K. Waller says:

      Thanks, Doris. In the past, I wouldn’t have shared this kind of information, but there are people I never and probably won’t see who, I knew, would be interested in what’s going on. Also, I think we still keep this disease under wraps, not like it used to be, but still it’s not talked about publicly at the personal level very much. So I decided to talk. (You notice is said, “this disease.” Under wraps.)

      Like

  2. Neva Bodin says:

    Thoroughly enjoyed your post. You conveyed many things well, with humor and grace. And your poetry references were great. Glad to know where you are on this journey also. I have a friend who finally trashed the turbans too and just went bald and bare until it was all over and her hair grew back curly and a little different color. You are definitely a “w-r-r-r-iter”. I relate to “time’s winged chariot” too.

    Like

    • M. K. Waller says:

      Thank you, Neva. I’m glad to hear of someone else who trashed the turbans. I don’t care to share the picture taken before my hair came back, but I didn’t mind walking around that way. Yeah, “time’s winged chariot” is the pits.

      Like

  3. Mike Staton says:

    I enjoyed the peek at your writer’s soul. So glad you got a clean bill of health, and hope the same holds true come March. And yes… you are a W-R-I-T-E-R/

    Like

  4. Kathy, I agree with you about wheelchairs in airports. I’m perfectly capable of walking but have discovered that using a wheelchair gets me faster service, and I’m more likely to make my connecting flight. I enjoyed your post and am glad life is going on for you.

    Like

    • M. K. Waller says:

      Thanks, Abbie. What I liked most about the wheelchair, aside from the fact that it took me long distances without my having to put a foot on the floor, was that I was one of the first to board the airplane. They called for pre-boards and then wheeled me down the ramp. That’s service.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wranglers says:

    Kathy, you are great. So pure and honest with a dash, nay–more than a dash a lot of humour thrown in the mix. Thanks for sharing, and for being such an elegant writer. Enjoyed it, and the info on Angelina. Cher’ley

    Like

    • M. K. Waller says:

      Thanks, Cher’ley. Those are very kind words. I didn’t intend to say anything about Angelina, but since I used her picture, I felt I had to explain who she was, and I couldn’t stop explaining. The idea of a woman blowing the side off a government building and running the Texas Rangers out of town delights me. The Texas Ranger histories I’ve read do not mention Angelina and her cannon.

      Like

  6. Anonymous says:

    Thank you

    Like

  7. Nancy Jardine says:

    Very poignant and yet very pragmatic. It takes guts to get on with a life threatening diagnosis and you have plenty. Your time during the writing of this post is well spent. Great quotes.I’d not heard of Angelina. My daughter was in Austin earlier this year so I’ll ask if she saw that statue.

    Like

    • M. K. Waller says:

      Thanks, Nancy. I’ve never had much in the way of guts, but I decided I could try to get on with things or just collapse. I have my not so gutsy days, too. I doubt most Texans know about Angelina. Austinites are more likely to have heard of her, especially now the statue is there. I hope your daughter liked Austin–in other words, I hope she saw some of the interesting points. And I hope she didn’t boil or fry in the horrible heat. I once spent a couple of days in Scotland, and it was so nice to be cold in July. And wet.

      Like

  8. wyoauthor1 says:

    Thank you for your honest words and a look into life from your perspective. Your post is thought-provoking and laced with great humor, and I thoroughly enjoyed it! As our colleagues have all pointed out: YOU ARE A WRITER! and I hope you keep spinning the tales for people’s enjoyment!

    Like

    • M. K. Waller says:

      Thanks, Gayle. I have a new perspective every day, I think. I hope your new pup is settling in happily–and I know he is. I miss dogs. I was checking out at a dermatologist’s office this week and saw a poodle sacked out in front of the copy machine. The receptionist asked if I needed a doggie fix and I went around the corner and Stella licked my face and applied other comforts only dogs can give. Then I came home to my cats, officially Earl Grey and William of Orange (Cream Soda), and resumed my position as serf.

      Like

  9. M. K. Waller says:

    Reblogged this on M. K. Waller and commented:
    I posted this on Writing Wranglers on the 19th. It was supposed to be 500 words but just kept getting longer and longer. So I really did stay up all night writing it.

    Like

  10. Terry Shames says:

    What an awe-inspiring post. Learned not only what you were going through, but the courage and grace with which you were facing the ordeal.

    Like

  11. S. J. Brown says:

    Thanks for the sharing. This honest view of what things have been like for you has enlightened me about not just your experience , but the experiences of others.

    Like

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